jauncourt: (Default)
A wonderful friend gave me my own set of the DVDs. Between that, and our dvd player and tv, I have an updated list of things I've observed about the shawl. A lot of this post is aggregated from a couple of posts on the thread over at BDK on Ravelry.

I had little success the last time (I have a whole card full of photos that really don’t give me much info), and having the DVD set (I had it on my DVR which isn’t really HD) and an okay little DVD player with digital upconvert and a really good ZOOM made a huge difference. I also put a fresh projector bulb in my digital projector tv, and that helped a lot.

I took a whole bunch of photos with my phone, because, of course, the battery was dead in BOTH decent cameras. Between fiddling with brightness/contrast on the tv and saturation on the phone, I got a couple of really decent shots of the back of the shawl. For blurry phone pictures of highly zoomed almost pixelated paused DVD video.. Argh.
I’ve spent hours pausing and zooming and inspecting the still images of the first 15-20 minutes of the ep and I’m pretty sure of several things about it.

  • it is for sure a top-down traditional (starts from the center of the long edge) mitred triangle
  • it has a double-eyelet border knit on or into the long edge
  • the pattern is a vertical open-chevrons-in-stripes pattern, with repeats of three chevrons and a wider solid chevron marking the ends of the repeats
  • there is a solid “stripe” between the chevron motifs that is 2-4 stitches wide
  • the chevrons point down and echo the border points
  • the openwork chevrons are made with 7 eyelets, with one at the point
  • the angle of the pattern when viewed from the back is not 45 degrees, so it’s probably a slightly shaped triangle/butterfly if laid out flat
  • it has a knitted on bottom border that is in pattern (the points of the border line up with the points of the chevron motifs creating an illusion that the border is not knit on)
  • there appear to be 15 21 points, including the three points of the triangle
  • that means there are 15 21 tassels or fringes (since there are so few, I am calling them tassels)
  • the tassels are tied on and appear to be made with 2 or 3 strands doubled over, and the length is not equal (or they are very worn and have attenuated and been torn over time)
  • it is made with a large singleply (like lamb’s pride worsted) or a very smooth/worn multi-ply
  • it is probably a wool or wool blend yarn, because the shawl looks like it has fulled a little bit due to age/wear or possibly deliberately during washing/blocking to stabilize the pattern (since it is so large)

I’ve ordered 2 different wool yarns from Webs to make the shawl. One of them is bound to be a better fit than the other: Nashua Handkints Creative Focus Chunky in Copper Carmine and Nashua Handkints Creative Focus Worsted in Brick.


Hope this makes things that I think I’m seeing clearer, I scanned some of my notes (not nearly all, just the most relevant ones).

Overview of my notes:


This is the scarf I made for the firefly-themed swap I was in recently, and which really helped with working out the borders and she spacing of the motifs:


Here’s an incomplete (doesn’t include the foundation row that the two halves point out from - it’s grafted in the middle) chart for the scarf above:


and rough charted notes from making the scarf (NOT the shawl!) for the corner of the sideways worked border (purl rows aren’t shown):


SO, that's where we are at this point.
jauncourt: (dress diary)
A wonderful friend gave me my own set of the DVDs. Between that, and our dvd player and tv, I have an updated list of things I've observed about the shawl. A lot of this post is aggregated from a couple of posts on the thread over at BDK on Ravelry.

I had little success the last time (I have a whole card full of photos that really don’t give me much info), and having the DVD set (I had it on my DVR which isn’t really HD) and an okay little DVD player with digital upconvert and a really good ZOOM made a huge difference. I also put a fresh projector bulb in my digital projector tv, and that helped a lot.

I took a whole bunch of photos with my phone, because, of course, the battery was dead in BOTH decent cameras. Between fiddling with brightness/contrast on the tv and saturation on the phone, I got a couple of really decent shots of the back of the shawl. For blurry phone pictures of highly zoomed almost pixelated paused DVD video.. Argh.
I’ve spent hours pausing and zooming and inspecting the still images of the first 15-20 minutes of the ep and I’m pretty sure of several things about it.

  • it is for sure a top-down traditional (starts from the center of the long edge) mitred triangle
  • it has a double-eyelet border knit on or into the long edge
  • the pattern is a vertical open-chevrons-in-stripes pattern, with repeats of three chevrons and a wider solid chevron marking the ends of the repeats
  • there is a solid “stripe” between the chevron motifs that is 2-4 stitches wide
  • the chevrons point down and echo the border points
  • the openwork chevrons are made with 7 eyelets, with one at the point
  • the angle of the pattern when viewed from the back is not 45 degrees, so it’s probably a slightly shaped triangle/butterfly if laid out flat
  • it has a knitted on bottom border that is in pattern (the points of the border line up with the points of the chevron motifs creating an illusion that the border is not knit on)
  • there appear to be 15 21 points, including the three points of the triangle
  • that means there are 15 21 tassels or fringes (since there are so few, I am calling them tassels)
  • the tassels are tied on and appear to be made with 2 or 3 strands doubled over, and the length is not equal (or they are very worn and have attenuated and been torn over time)
  • it is made with a large singleply (like lamb’s pride worsted) or a very smooth/worn multi-ply
  • it is probably a wool or wool blend yarn, because the shawl looks like it has fulled a little bit due to age/wear or possibly deliberately during washing/blocking to stabilize the pattern (since it is so large)

I’ve ordered 2 different wool yarns from Webs to make the shawl. One of them is bound to be a better fit than the other: Nashua Handkints Creative Focus Chunky in Copper Carmine and Nashua Handkints Creative Focus Worsted in Brick.


Hope this makes things that I think I’m seeing clearer, I scanned some of my notes (not nearly all, just the most relevant ones).

Overview of my notes:


This is the scarf I made for the firefly-themed swap I was in recently, and which really helped with working out the borders and she spacing of the motifs:


Here’s an incomplete (doesn’t include the foundation row that the two halves point out from - it’s grafted in the middle) chart for the scarf above:


and rough charted notes from making the scarf (NOT the shawl!) for the corner of the sideways worked border (purl rows aren’t shown):


SO, that's where we are at this point.

ETA: Got the shawl charted. Took HOURS. Even using a spreadsheet program. The border is different than the scarf border, the shawl has a 1 stitch line between chevrons, I am not writing out the instructions until I have worked any bugs out of the chart, and I'm not quite sure how the double eyelet band is going to work as I have it currently charted, but we have a workable, testable pattern chart! WooHoo!
jauncourt: (Default)
I am teaching 3 classes at the Known World Costuming Symposium in October. This is a sort of public service announcement, as my class descriptions on the KWCS website are incomplete. This is a public post, please feel free to spread this around.

 Bliauts, Broad Skirts and Belled Sleeves: Making the Court Dress of 12th Century Western Europe
Class Description:         An overview of elements of court styles, the basic cuts of male and female court dress, with handouts of sample cuts and a demonstration of appropriate layers and period cutting methods.
Length of Class:  1.5 hours with a half hour optional q&a period during which I will help students measure for garments    
Class size? 15 students
What supplies/equipment should students bring to class, if any?  Measuring tape and notepaper and pencil, if help with measuring is desired.
There will be a handout fee of $1 requested per person (to cover printing costs), handout packets will contain multiple pages.


Adventures in Dagging: 14th Century Dagge Manufacturing Techniques from Archaeological Examples
Class Description:         A workshop during which students will get the opportunity to make their own sample fulled wool (or synthetic felt*) dagges using various scissor techniques.
Length of Class:  1 hr     
Class size?  10 participating, up to 5 additional 'auditing' (viewing as a demo only)
What supplies/equipment should students bring to class, if any?  Scissors, notepaper and pencil
*limited quantities of synthetic felt will be provided for those who are allergic to wool.
There will be a $5 materials fee for the materials and info packet. Handout packets will be multiple pages, all materials for workshop participation are provided. 5 extra handouts will be brought, and a $1 fee to cover printing costs is requested for those who do not wish to participate in the hands-on workshop.


 Serpentine Braids or Straight as a Scabbard: Women's Court Hairdressing in 12th Century Western Europe
Class Description:         Informal workshop with handouts. Primarily a demo of braiding techniques, accessories (tapes, jewelled  weights, veils and circlets) and covering appropriate styles. Handouts will include short instructions and ideas for making some accessories yourself. Demonstration volunteers gratefully accepted, but our time is short so I can only do two or three ladies (if no volunteers, I'll be demoing on a wig stand).
Length of Class:  1 hr    
Class size?  10 (slightly flexible)
What supplies/equipment should students bring to class, if any?   Long-haired attendees who wish to volunteer for styling demonstration should bring their own combs and ribbons. Ribbons should be 3x as long as the hair to be styled.
 There will be a handout fee of $1 requested to cover handout printing costs, handout packets will have multiple pages. (I'm still writing them up, but it's looking to be about 8 pages right now)

My handout fees are calculated to cover the copier fees of 10 cents/page. Most handout packets will be 10 or more pages. All handouts will be included in the symposium proceedings, provided I get them in by the end of this week.

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